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- dnewlin - 08-10-1999 12:31 PM

Where can I fins a list of organic wines from California?


- Tabby - 08-10-1999 01:06 PM

All I know of organic wines from California is that Bonterra do a good range. They're the organic twig of Fetzer, a great value for money Californian producer.


- BBB - 08-18-1999 09:33 AM

What is an organic wine?


- Thomas - 08-18-1999 10:44 AM

Since wine is a naturally fermented product, and since most chemicals used for spraying vines are organic, that is a good question.


- dnewlin - 08-18-1999 12:33 PM

Perhaps more info would be useful...I have several friends who want to, but who don't drink wine (particularly reds), because they have an alergic reaction to trace amounts of the sulfites that exist in many wines. My understanding is that vineyard farmers that subscribe to "organic" or "biodynamic" growing practices actually produce wines that are free of sulfites. Hence my inquiry about a list of "organic" wines. If my assumption is incorrect, please let me know. Otherwise, I'm still interested in a list. Thanx!


- Bucko - 08-18-1999 01:34 PM

First off, no wine is free of sulphur compounds. It is a natural byproduct of fermentation.

Secondly, it is by far the HISTAMINES in red wine that cause problems, not sulfites. True allergy to sulfites is not very common.

Just ask Dr. Foodie. [Image: wink.gif]

Bucko


- Thomas - 08-18-1999 01:58 PM

I pick up Bucko's gauntlet...

The level of sulfites found in wine would be working triple overtime to cause an allergic reaction (20 parts per million on average).

Bucko is of course a doctor, and he knows about the histamines in red wine, which is usually the cause of allergic reactions to the stuff. Even I sneeze when I drink some reds (but I sally forth anyway).

To find the true meaning of the word organic, look to product promotion.


- dnewlin - 08-18-1999 02:17 PM

Thank you Bucko and foodie for educating me about sulfites and histamines. That was very helpful! So now, my question becomes...is it possible to know which California red wines have the lowest level (or zero) of histamines? Alternately, for someone who is hypersensative to histamines in red wine, what information is available about the level of histamines in any given wine so they can avoid those with higher levels?


- Jerry D Mead - 08-18-1999 06:19 PM

Re sulfites...interestingly, white wines (which don't usually cause people problems) generally speaking have higher sulfite levels than red wines...because sulfite is used as an anti-oxidant and whites need that more than reds.

No one measures histamine content to my knowledge. A doctor of my acquaintance recommends trying a non-drowsy anti-histamine just before going to a dinner where one expects red wine to be served.

One generally hears more complaints about young reds than old ones...so you might try serving 10-20 year old Cabernets or Bordeaux to your sensative friends.

JDM


- Bucko - 08-18-1999 07:22 PM

"Enlightened" physicians should have no problem prescribing you or your friend a non-sedating anti-histamine e.g. Allegra or Claritin. Don't blow sunshine up their backside, be straightforward, tell them you love wine but have a histamine reaction, and that you want some Allegra or Claritin. If they don't want to do it, you need to find another physician.

Bucko


- Thomas - 08-19-1999 08:07 AM

I am not so sure the histamines can be measured in the wine, but I know they are not.

Each wine will or will not be a sinus problem based on the treatment it receives. I suspect that compounds in oak and red wine skins join to create the (minor) problem. But I am only suspicious -- no proof.

And Curm. has it right: younger reds aged in oak seem to be more forward in their offering of headaches and sneezes.


- Thomas - 08-19-1999 08:07 AM

I am not so sure the histamines can be measured in the wine, but I know they are not.

Each wine will or will not be a sinus problem based on the treatment it receives. I suspect that compounds in oak and red wine skins join to create the (minor) problem. But I am only suspicious -- no proof.

And Curm. has it right: younger reds aged in oak seem to be more forward in their offering of headaches and sneezes.


- dnewlin - 08-19-1999 09:13 AM

Well, I think we've exhausted this topic...at least for the original purpose that I had in mind! Thanx to all of you for your informative responses. I really appreciate your input.